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    thank you! that scene made me so uncomfortable

    Yes thanks!!!! I think it’s supposed to, but I don’t know if all the fans got the memo. There seem to be two schools of thought approaching that scene- people who romanticize it (which they should feel weird and gross already, STOP shipping teenager girls with adult men, ew) and people who excuse it by saying Beth made him upset, of course he’d react like that. But however rude and hurtful her presumptions about him were doesn’t justify it; how drunk he was doesn’t justify it; the abuse he suffered doesn’t justify it. It might EXPLAIN it, but it doesn’t justify it. People see Daryl as this perfect character who can do no wrong, but that was definitely fucked up and I think we are supposed to view it that way. We’re SUPPOSED to be uncomfortable and I worry about people who weren’t.

    I mean, any time there’s a physical conflict between a male and a female character where they aren’t of a disclosed equal strength (and even then), there’s already a power imbalance coming into play. Daryl is obviously significantly stronger than Beth and it takes very little physical effort on his part to overpower her. You add into that the clear power imbalance of Beth being so much YOUNGER than him- no one is exactly a child in this world anymore, but she’s only eighteen years old at a max now, and especially in comparison to Daryl still a child. Daryl has more power than her physically, more social power connected with his gender, and more social power in being so much older than her; and you have to take care when you are given that much power not to abuse it and that’s WHAT HE DID.

    I don’t know about anybody else, but the complete ease with which he could have done anything to her (not that he would have) made me feel sick to my stomach, and I think that’s how we were supposed to feel. This character- who we know has all of this strength but it is all muted under the pain he’s gone through and his natural submission- suddenly wields it, and he wields it against someone who in comparison is in no position to defend herself. We’re supposed to find that repugnant, we’re supposed to be disturbed by it, and we’re supposed to wonder how much of this is coming from Daryl’s father and not himself. We’re supposed to see how it’s magnified and set on fire by the losses he’s struggling with and the hurt Beth so casually deals him when she questions what he feels is his character. But we’re NOT supposed to think it’s okay or understandable or forgivable, and we’re sure as hell not supposed to think it’s romantic.

    Eurgh, that whole scene just turns my stomach up to his breakdown, and I think it’s supposed to. I wish people would recognize and talk about that more because it’s a frightening peek at which road Daryl could go down if he didn’t have people like Rick who convinced him he was worth more than that, and that he’s not his father after all.

    Reblogged from king-of-thelab  18,989 notes
    fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly


“Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” - Kevin Spak, Newser


"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly


Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. - Leanne Aguilera, E! Online


"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It


The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress


So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly


"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon


"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic


"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint


"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes


"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times


In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times


The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky


His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.


It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club


If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate


This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired


"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine


I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon


"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine


"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week


The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

    fatpinkcast:

    Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

    "I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly

    Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” Kevin Spak, Newser

    "In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly

    Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. Leanne Aguilera, E! Online

    "If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It

    The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress

    So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly

    "…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon

    "The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

    "A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint

    "Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes

    "The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times

    In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times

    The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky

    His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.

    It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club

    If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate

    This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired

    "How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine

    I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon

    "I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine

    "I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week

    The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

    Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

    Reblogged from nijimei  2,866 notes

    rosalarian:

    rosalarian:

    When I say people want to see more diversity in stories, no, I really don’t mean different stories about straight white dudes. I really, really don’t mean that at all. This isn’t about types of stories being told. This is specifically about people. I’m not letting you make this about something else. You are not hijacking this message to make sure we’re still talking about straight white dudes.

    The saga continues:

    This made me actually sputter with frustration. Saliva exited my mouth. Why do you think your opinion SHOULD matter on this subject? Why should your opinion be given the same weight over people who are actually living these experiences? Especially when my original point was about how minorities rarely get to tell their own stories. I’ve been really patient with him but he’s taken up way too much of my time and he’s still missing the point like he’s trying to actively avoid it.

    Reblogged from darylgrimes  227 notes

    normansreeds:

    i just wish people would stop pairing daryl off with every female he talks to. he’s so much more than that, he doesn’t need relationships to get fans, he’s interesting enough without it, so why do daryl fans keep intensely shipping him with every frickin’ girl he looks at?

    not to mention how much it tends to devalue female characters if they’re perpetually being viewed only in a romantic context to male characters right

    Reblogged from feministwalkingdead  105 notes

    Thoughts on “The Grove” (Feminist Walking Dead)

    feministwalkingdead:

    A brilliant episode. Amazing, heartbreaking performances. Beautifully written. Please assume I said this about a thousand times.

    Let’s talk about what was revealed in this episode: No surprise — Lizzie was the walker-feeder and rat-dissector. But it was also revealed that Carol actually did kill Karen and David. (To be fair, Melissa McBride has been saying since day one that Carol did it.) I still think it was a sloppy job and unlike Carol, but at this point, it is what it is.

    So, we have Carol, who is haunted throughout this episode — by Sophia, by what she did to Karen and David, and ultimately, by the realization that despite all her efforts to protect the people she loves, she ultimately has little control over how things will play out. It’s going to change her, and I look forward to seeing how.

    Despite the consequences of her decisions, she hasn’t been written into a corner like Andrea and Lori were. Unlike those two characters, she also hasn’t been punished, and she hasn’t been redeemed. Her path is more complicated than that. In fact, this episode absolutely cements Carol’s status as the most nuanced and well-developed character on the show. I’m impressed. The Season 1 Curse (something I just made up) seems to have been lifted.

    The show also did a great job of defining Mika in very little time. The sweet-faced child was a tender-hearted little science geek who had a very clear moral code and a playful sense of humor. (Compare this to what we knew about Sophia.) I’m happy they fleshed her out, because we didn’t need any more blonde sacrificial lambs on this show.

    Reblogged from astercalling  17,406 notes

    I wanted to show that men and women can be friends without having a relationship,” says del Toro of the relationship between the two main characters Mako (played by Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi) and Raleigh (“Sons of Anarchy” star Charlie Hunnam). “Theirs is a story about partnership, equality and a strong bond between partners. It’s important for little girls to know not every story has to be a love story and for boys to know that soldiers aren’t the only ones to triumph in war. By

    Guillermo del Toro

    I think I might I’ve read all Pacific Rim related post on internet and this quote give me so many feels. Guillermo del toro is such a great guy. I should start to work on real life, but Pacific Rim is way much better.

    (via littlehobbitsoul)

    Reblogged from no-literally  611 notes
    Hi Ivy! If you've already answered this you can ignore but I'm curious. I know you're a feminist and also a Moffat fan and that's sort of news to me because I constantly see a lot of people complaining about how he portrays his women characters on TV and calling him sexist, misogynist, etc. especially after his adaption of Irene Adler). Could you say something about that? I'd like to know your opinion. (sorry for my poor English)
    Anonymous

    no-literally:

    ivyblossom:

    As a feminist, what I want from media is that women are portrayed as whole human beings with strengths, weaknesses, and motives of their own. That’s all. I’m not looking for female characters who demonstrate any kind of ideals. I’m perfectly happy to see women who are defeated, who need help, who make mistakes, as long as they are being defeated, needing help, and making mistakes for their own reasons and in the pursuit of their own goals. Even if those goals are deluded. Even if they’re bad goals. Male characters are allowed to do this. They’re allowed to screw up, make bad decisions, be weak, need rescuing. Why shouldn’t female characters have the same leeway? 

    Read More

    I feel awful arguing against this, because Ivy (whose fandom meta I greatly respect and adore) lays out a really wonderful argument for well-written women who don’t fall into the trap of “strong female characters.” And I love that argument. But I want to reply and say that I don’t think that’s the aspect of Moffat’s writing that upsets me, from a feminist perspective.

    Because, in the end, I don’t think see textured women facing obstacles, I see women built around a single archetype over and over (Moffat builds his men around archetypes as well, but he’s got multiple archetypes he seems to use as the basis for his men). I also see a disproportionate number of good father figures and without many corresponding examples of strong mother figures, and—in Doctor Who, especially—I see leading women whose identities are only special/noteworthy because of their relationship to the men in their lives.


    I honestly feel a little nervous posting this comment because I adore and respect IvyBlossom’s writing so much. But of my favorite things about fandom is the variety of opinions we get to see expressed across Tumblr, and I thought it was worth sharing an opposing perspective. So please know that I say none of this to insult or offend—I just wanted to offer an alternative view on the topic.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Reblogged from samcr0w  7,973 notes